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1
Задание 43 № 43

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А43 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

Nero, the handsome seven-year-old African lion, can obviously sense, early though it still is, that this is not going to be

just another day. (A43) _____

The courtyard outside is noisy with people carrying bottles, syringes, drugs, drips and bandages and in half an hour a

mini operating theatre is set up right on Nero's doorstep. (A44) _____

'The nerve in the tooth is now totally dead,' explains veterinary dentist Peter Kertesz, who has worked on animals' teeth

for 14 years. (A45) _____

Peter and his assistant Samantha divide their time between working with humans (Mondays to Thursdays) and treating

animals (Fridays). Under the name Zoodent International, Peter, 47, performs more dental work on animals than any

other practice in the world

1) He has spent the night in his cage, as usual, but now, when he should be wandering through the Safari Park, he's still here. He paws irritably at the bars of his cage.
2) As he roars his disapproval, he reveals the broken front tooth that is the reason for all this fuss. Today, the dentist is visiting the king of the jungle.
3) 'It could become infected and result in an abscess. An infected tooth may eventually kill an animal once the bacteria enter the bloodstream.'
4) 'The tinned food we feed them doesn't contain the fibre, which is a self-cleaning agent and is bad for the teeth,' says Peter.

2
Задание 44 № 44

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А44 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

Nero, the handsome seven-year-old African lion, can obviously sense, early though it still is, that this is not going to be

just another day. (A43) _____

The courtyard outside is noisy with people carrying bottles, syringes, drugs, drips and bandages and in half an hour a

mini operating theatre is set up right on Nero's doorstep. (A44) _____

'The nerve in the tooth is now totally dead,' explains veterinary dentist Peter Kertesz, who has worked on animals' teeth

for 14 years. (A45) _____

Peter and his assistant Samantha divide their time between working with humans (Mondays to Thursdays) and treating

animals (Fridays). Under the name Zoodent International, Peter, 47, performs more dental work on animals than any

other practice in the world

1) He has spent the night in his cage, as usual, but now, when he should be wandering through the Safari Park, he‟s still here. He paws irritably at the bars of his cage.
2) As he roars his disapproval, he reveals the broken front tooth that is the reason for all this fuss. Today, the dentist is visiting the king of the jungle.
3) 'It could become infected and result in an abscess. An infected tooth may eventually kill an animal once the bacteria enter the bloodstream.'
4) 'The tinned food we feed them doesn't contain the fibre, which is a self-cleaning agent and is bad for the teeth,' says Peter.

3
Задание 45 № 45

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А45 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

Nero, the handsome seven-year-old African lion, can obviously sense, early though it still is, that this is not going to be

just another day. (A43) _____

The courtyard outside is noisy with people carrying bottles, syringes, drugs, drips and bandages and in half an hour a

mini operating theatre is set up right on Nero's doorstep. (A44) _____

'The nerve in the tooth is now totally dead,' explains veterinary dentist Peter Kertesz, who has worked on animals' teeth

for 14 years. (A45) _____

Peter and his assistant Samantha divide their time between working with humans (Mondays to Thursdays) and treating

animals (Fridays). Under the name Zoodent International, Peter, 47, performs more dental work on animals than any

other practice in the world

1) He has spent the night in his cage, as usual, but now, when he should be wandering through the Safari Park, he‟s still here. He paws irritably at the bars of his cage.
2) As he roars his disapproval, he reveals the broken front tooth that is the reason for all this fuss. Today, the dentist is visiting the king of the jungle.
3) 'It could become infected and result in an abscess. An infected tooth may eventually kill an animal once the bacteria enter the bloodstream.'
4) 'The tinned food we feed them doesn't contain the fibre, which is a self-cleaning agent and is bad for the teeth,' says Peter.

4
Задание 46 № 46

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А46 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

'Working with animals is much more difficult than with humans,' he says, as Samantha lays out the rows of dental

instruments. 'With an animal, I have to make an on-the-spot diagnosis and work very quickly.' (A46) _____

Peter now moves close to the bars of Nero‟s cage and expertly directs a tiny, plastic blowpipe dart, containing a high

dose of anaesthetic, into the lion‟s thigh (бедро). (A47) _____

It takes six men to lift and move the 180 kilogram animal 2 metres from his cage door to the hay mattress that will serve

as an operating table.

(A48) _____ Peter discovers a tooth that needs filling and he sets about doing that first. 'This is the same stuff as we use

for human teeth,' he says, packing the medicine into the cavity. 'There‟s just more of it.'

The dental work now over, Peter removes a gas canister from the lion‟s mouth. Without the supply of gas, Nero will start

coming round fairly quickly, so the keepers move fast to pull him back to his cage. As Peter packs up, the lion stirs. The

great yellow eyes are beginning to lose their drugged and sleepy look. 'Don't be fooled,' says Peter, 'He might appear

sleepy but he could react very quickly now if he wanted to ...'

1) Nero lets out a loud growl before falling to the floor of his cage. Peter waits for a few minutes before giving the signal to unlock the heavy barred door.
2) Samantha checks that everything is in place. Once everything's ready, she signals to Peter that they are all set for the patient.
3) The lion opens his mouth and keeps his jaws wide apart to let Peter inspect his mouth for any other dental problems.
4) Peter sets to work immediately, examining the great mouth with the help of an endoscope – a long metal tube with a light at its tip.

5
Задание 47 № 47

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А47 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

'Working with animals is much more difficult than with humans,' he says, as Samantha lays out the rows of dental

instruments. 'With an animal, I have to make an on-the-spot diagnosis and work very quickly.' (A46) _____

Peter now moves close to the bars of Nero‟s cage and expertly directs a tiny, plastic blowpipe dart, containing a high

dose of anaesthetic, into the lion‟s thigh (бедро). (A47) _____

It takes six men to lift and move the 180 kilogram animal 2 metres from his cage door to the hay mattress that will serve

as an operating table.

(A48) _____ Peter discovers a tooth that needs filling and he sets about doing that first. 'This is the same stuff as we use

for human teeth,' he says, packing the medicine into the cavity. 'There‟s just more of it.'

The dental work now over, Peter removes a gas canister from the lion‟s mouth. Without the supply of gas, Nero will start

coming round fairly quickly, so the keepers move fast to pull him back to his cage. As Peter packs up, the lion stirs. The

great yellow eyes are beginning to lose their drugged and sleepy look. 'Don't be fooled,' says Peter, 'He might appear

sleepy but he could react very quickly now if he wanted to ...'

1) Nero lets out a loud growl before falling to the floor of his cage. Peter waits for a few minutes before giving the signal to unlock the heavy barred door.
2) Samantha checks that everything is in place. Once everything's ready, she signals to Peter that they are all set for the patient.
3) The lion opens his mouth and keeps his jaws wide apart to let Peter inspect his mouth for any other dental problems.
4) Peter sets to work immediately, examining the great mouth with the help of an endoscope – a long metal tube with a light at its tip.

6
Задание 48 № 48

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуски одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Заполните пропуск А48 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1–4).

 

'Working with animals is much more difficult than with humans,' he says, as Samantha lays out the rows of dental

instruments. 'With an animal, I have to make an on-the-spot diagnosis and work very quickly.' (A46) _____

Peter now moves close to the bars of Nero‟s cage and expertly directs a tiny, plastic blowpipe dart, containing a high

dose of anaesthetic, into the lion‟s thigh (бедро). (A47) _____

It takes six men to lift and move the 180 kilogram animal 2 metres from his cage door to the hay mattress that will serve

as an operating table.

(A48) _____ Peter discovers a tooth that needs filling and he sets about doing that first. 'This is the same stuff as we use

for human teeth,' he says, packing the medicine into the cavity. 'There‟s just more of it.'

The dental work now over, Peter removes a gas canister from the lion‟s mouth. Without the supply of gas, Nero will start

coming round fairly quickly, so the keepers move fast to pull him back to his cage. As Peter packs up, the lion stirs. The

great yellow eyes are beginning to lose their drugged and sleepy look. 'Don't be fooled,' says Peter, 'He might appear

sleepy but he could react very quickly now if he wanted to ...'

1) Nero lets out a loud growl before falling to the floor of his cage. Peter waits for a few minutes before giving the signal to unlock the heavy barred door.
2) Samantha checks that everything is in place. Once everything's ready, she signals to Peter that they are all set for the patient.
3) The lion opens his mouth and keeps his jaws wide apart to let Peter inspect his mouth for any other dental problems.
4) Peter sets to work immediately, examining the great mouth with the help of an endoscope – a long metal tube with a light at its tip.

7
Задание 43 № 403

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Apart from the obvious adverts that we see every day on TV, on billboards and in newspapers and magazines, there is a whole 'other world' of advertising messages fighting for our attention.

2 — However, this is a truly inescapable form of advertising.

3 — To advertising executives and agencies, it would have cen 'a dream come true'.

4 — Take 'product placement', for example.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

8
Задание 44 № 404

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Apart from the obvious adverts that we see every day on TV, on billboards and in newspapers and magazines, there is a whole 'other world' of advertising messages fighting for our attention.

2 — However, this is a truly inescapable form of advertising.

3 — To advertising executives and agencies, it would have cen 'a dream come true'.

4 — Take 'product placement', for example.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

9
Задание 45 № 405

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Apart from the obvious adverts that we see every day on TV, on billboards and in newspapers and magazines, there is a whole 'other world' of advertising messages fighting for our attention.

2 — However, this is a truly inescapable form of advertising.

3 — To advertising executives and agencies, it would have cen 'a dream come true'.

4 — Take 'product placement', for example.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

10
Задание 46 № 406

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — To a certain extent, this would not change a thing.

2 — The hope is to convince people to believe that if they can have the products, then they can have the cool, happy lifestyles of their heroes, too.

3 — Nowadays, many TV adverts have become more like soap operas with a series of humorous adventures complete with their own cast.

4 — Some advertising companies even employ 'cool hunters' or marketing professionals to find out for them exactly what young people find cool.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

11
Задание 47 № 407

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — To a certain extent, this would not change a thing.

2 — The hope is to convince people to believe that if they can have the products, then they can have the cool, happy lifestyles of their heroes, too.

3 — Nowadays, many TV adverts have become more like soap operas with a series of humorous adventures complete with their own cast.

4 — Some advertising companies even employ 'cool hunters' or marketing professionals to find out for them exactly what young people find cool.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

12
Задание 48 № 408

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — To a certain extent, this would not change a thing.

2 — The hope is to convince people to believe that if they can have the products, then they can have the cool, happy lifestyles of their heroes, too.

3 — Nowadays, many TV adverts have become more like soap operas with a series of humorous adventures complete with their own cast.

4 — Some advertising companies even employ 'cool hunters' or marketing professionals to find out for them exactly what young people find cool.


A few years ago, a company called Space Marketing came up with a plan to send a mile-long advertisement into space. Using light reflected from the sun, it would beam out a message as large as the moon that could be seen by every single person on the planet as it orbited the Earth.

This would have been one advert that couldn't have been thrown out with the junk mail or switched off by remote control. (A43)___ Advertising standards agencies eventually decided not to allow Space Marketing to go ahead with their plans and they were forced to abandon them, but not before several major companies had made serious enquiries about launching their logos into space.

Space may indeed be the final frontier for advertisers, because on Earth we are already surrounded by advertising wherever we are and whatever we are doing. (A44)___ There are the promises of health and vitality on the cereal packet weate from this morning, for example, and the ad that we saw on the side of the bus we caught to work. Most of the time, we are probably not even aware of these less obvious advertising tactics, but that doesn't mean that they aren't effective. (A45)___ You are in a packed cinema, watching the latest Hollywood blockbuster. There are adverts before the film or during a break in the film, but are there any during the film? Well, look carefully at the make of car your favourite actor is driving. And what about his watch? Can you see what brand it is? Chances are, you can, and the company that owns the brand is likely to have paid thousands for it to appear in the film.

Whilst products are most often placed' in this way in movies and TV series, they also sometimes appear in music videos, video games, plays and even books. (A46)___ You may not realise you are being influenced by a technique that sounds so simple, but advertisers consider product placement to be a highly effective form of advertising. After all, they would not be willing to spend as much money as they do on it if they didn't truly believe it worked.

In fact, associating products with cool, exciting lives seems to be one of the most common forms of advertising. (A47)___

And let's not forget the power of pure entertainment (A48)___ If the consumers are looking forward to the next 'episode' of an ad, once again the product has become associated with something 'cool" and is therefore likely to See a considerable rise in popularity.

So, whether Space Marketing eventually succeeds in launching ads into space or not is perhaps a less important issue than it might seem.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

13
Задание 43 № 463

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Firstly, he said, we should try to include the background in an unusual way.

2 — Yet by myself I didn't have a clue how to go about getting some good shots.

3 — Some of the advice didn't work as well as I expected.

4 — How you position yourself is also really important.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

14
Задание 44 № 464

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Firstly, he said, we should try to include the background in an unusual way.

2 — Yet by myself I didn't have a clue how to go about getting some good shots.

3 — Some of the advice didn't work as well as I expected.

4 — How you position yourself is also really important.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

15
Задание 45 № 465

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Firstly, he said, we should try to include the background in an unusual way.

2 — Yet by myself I didn't have a clue how to go about getting some good shots.

3 — Some of the advice didn't work as well as I expected.

4 — How you position yourself is also really important.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

16
Задание 46 № 466

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I didn't get at all tired, even though I was on my feet for such a long time.

2 — According to Antonio, however, it's much better to try to find one interesting detail.

3 — Afterwards, feeling refreshed, I spent the rest of the afternoon alone practising my new skills.

4 — It just goes to show that it is not the equipment that counts but how you use it.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

17
Задание 47 № 467

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I didn't get at all tired, even though I was on my feet for such a long time.

2 — According to Antonio, however, it's much better to try to find one interesting detail.

3 — Afterwards, feeling refreshed, I spent the rest of the afternoon alone practising my new skills.

4 — It just goes to show that it is not the equipment that counts but how you use it.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

18
Задание 48 № 468

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I didn't get at all tired, even though I was on my feet for such a long time.

2 — According to Antonio, however, it's much better to try to find one interesting detail.

3 — Afterwards, feeling refreshed, I spent the rest of the afternoon alone practising my new skills.

4 — It just goes to show that it is not the equipment that counts but how you use it.


Like most tourists, I enjoy taking photographs on holiday and can't wait to show them to friends and family when I get back. But whilst for me they represent treasured memories, to others they are more often than not simply a collection of boring, badly composed, out of focus pictures. So this year I decided to do something about this by booking myself on a trip to Rome which included photography lessons.

The first time I went to Rome, I remember thinking that it was a photographer's paradise with a fantastic photo opportunity lying around every corner. (A43) ___ Added to this was the fact that there were crowds of tourists everywhere, blocking all the best views. But this second time things were different. Antonio, my photography tutor, was on hand to give expert advice every step of the way.

The first thing Antonio told our group was that the secret to creating a good photographic image rather than just a snapshot is to first take a long look at what you want to photograph. For example, he said, you should consider the background just as much as you do the subject. (A44) ___ You can get unwanted figures out of your image simply by getting down on your knees to take a picture, for instance, or changing the angle of the shot.

Our first port of call was Piazza Navona, where Antonio gave us advice about how to photograph the Fountain of Neptune. (A45) ___ Then, he added that we should take the photo with the fountain slightly off centre.

Next, we headed off to the Pantheon, which was originally an ancient Roman temple. Along the way, I took the opportunity to photograph anything that caught my eye. The Pantheon itself is so huge that it is impossible to take a good photograph of the whole thing. (A46) ___ I tried out this technique by lying down on the floor and taking a picture of just one section of the great domed ceiling. I was pretty pleased with the results.

For the next couple of hours, we wandered around the historic centre visiting many of Rome's architectural highlights. (A47) ___ And I felt that I was really able to appreciate the sights as I had to look at each one so carefully in order to get good pictures.

We finished off our first morning tour with a stop at a traditional Roman street café. After all the hard work and walking I'd done, a large Italian ice cream seemed like the perfect reward! (A48) ___ It felt like a whole new world had opened up to me. I learnt an incredible amount over the next two days, as well as having a thoroughly enjoyable time in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

19
Задание 43 № 523

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — There the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime.

2 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

3 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

4 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

20
Задание 44 № 524

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — There the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime.

2 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

3 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

4 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

21
Задание 45 № 525

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — There the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime.

2 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

3 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

4 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

22
Задание 46 № 526

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

2 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.

3 — Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers.

4 — Typical boring tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect's phone records for clues to a crime.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

23
Задание 47 № 527

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

2 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.

3 — Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers.

4 — Typical boring tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect's phone records for clues to a crime.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

24
Задание 48 № 528

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов. Один фрагмент является лишним.

 

1 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

2 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.

3 — Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers.

4 — Typical boring tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect's phone records for clues to a crime.


Wayback in 1828, the world's first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as C.I.D) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain clothes detective in the C.I.D is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43) ___ Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there's no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ___ An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective. Most of these "detectives-to-be' discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. (A45) ___ For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects though deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the C.I.D. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A46) ___ Not exactly exciting, but essential duties all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A47) ___ Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective's job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A48) ___ Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective's goal achieved. Then there's always the next case to tackle, of course.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

25
Задание 43 № 583

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I think the most valuable piece of advice I can give them is never to throw anything away.

2 — The contents had to be washed, ironed and sorted.

3 — Eric and I managed to persuade them to provide ones for clothes, too.

4 — You might think this would be a relatively easy task.


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

26
Задание 44 № 584

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I think the most valuable piece of advice I can give them is never to throw anything away.

2 — The contents had to be washed, ironed and sorted.

3 — Eric and I managed to persuade them to provide ones for clothes, too.

4 — You might think this would be a relatively easy task.


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

27
Задание 45 № 585

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — I think the most valuable piece of advice I can give them is never to throw anything away.

2 — The contents had to be washed, ironed and sorted.

3 — Eric and I managed to persuade them to provide ones for clothes, too.

4 — You might think this would be a relatively easy task.


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

28
Задание 46 № 586

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — In 2002, my turn came around.

2 — Once I had learnt the basic principles of managing my own business, I never looked back, they said.

3 — Once again, though, Adventure came to my aid, providing me with financial support through this difficult time.

4 — It turned out that there were plenty!


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

29
Задание 47 № 587

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — In 2002, my turn came around.

2 — Once I had learnt the basic principles of managing my own business, I never looked back, they said.

3 — Once again, though, Adventure came to my aid, providing me with financial support through this difficult time.

4 — It turned out that there were plenty!


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

30
Задание 48 № 588

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — In 2002, my turn came around.

2 — Once I had learnt the basic principles of managing my own business, I never looked back, they said.

3 — Once again, though, Adventure came to my aid, providing me with financial support through this difficult time.

4 — It turned out that there were plenty!


It was back in 1995, when my husband Eric was working as a rubbish collector for the local town council, that I first got the idea of recycling clothes. He would frequently find bags of perfectly good clothes just thrown into the rubbish. I wondered if I would be able to do something with them which would make money for me and perhaps even help the community at the same time. I decided to give it a try.

The first thing I did was to place an advertisement in the newspaper inviting people in the neighbourhood to bring me their second-hand clothing, shoes and bedding instead of throwing them away. Within a week, our garage was bursting with black plastic bags. (A43) ___ This kept me busy for weeks.

At the same time, I was also looking for a shop to rent where I could sell these items. (A44) ___ But it wasn't until I contacted Adventure, an organisation which helps people to set up their own businesses, that I finally got the assistance I needed. They helped me find the right shop and gave me advice about getting a business loan to get me started. That's how Second Best was born.

For my idea to work, I was going to need a steady supply of clothes. The town council already had recycling bins for paper, glass and the like. (A45) ___ I was able to make arrangements to have the clothes collected and brought to my shop, where I had installed laundry facilities to cope with all the washloads I needed to do!

It wasn't only making money in the shop that interested me, though. I was still eager for the community to benefit from my idea, too, so I started to find ways that the large quantities of very old or damaged clothing that I couldn't sell in the shop could be put to use. (A46) ___ Some of the old clothing is now turned into bandages for hospitals, for example, while one school in the area asks for old jeans to make into lunch bags.

Adventure believes in encouraging people by giving an annual Special Merit Award to the most successful new business they have helped. (A47) ___ Not only had I helped so many others, they said, but I had also had to overcome a difficulty. In 2000, my shop had been destroyed by fire and I had had to start the business all over again from Scratch.

Getting back on track wasn't easy. Not only did I have to search for another shop to rent, but I also had to spend time building up new stocks of clothes, as nearly all of the original stock had been destroyed. (A48) ___ Otherwise, I would have been forced to call it a day.

Today, twelve years after I first started up, Second Best is a very successful small business.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

31
Задание 43 № 643

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Then a contemporary dance company who were on tour staged a performance in our town, which I went to see.

2 — For this reason, I feel inspired to try having a similar job myself someday.

3 — What matters is using the act of moving as a means of expressing yourself.

4 — In London, there are literally thousands of highly talented performing artists of all kinds.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

32
Задание 44 № 644

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Then a contemporary dance company who were on tour staged a performance in our town, which I went to see.

2 — For this reason, I feel inspired to try having a similar job myself someday.

3 — What matters is using the act of moving as a means of expressing yourself.

4 — In London, there are literally thousands of highly talented performing artists of all kinds.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

33
Задание 45 № 645

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Then a contemporary dance company who were on tour staged a performance in our town, which I went to see.

2 — For this reason, I feel inspired to try having a similar job myself someday.

3 — What matters is using the act of moving as a means of expressing yourself.

4 — In London, there are literally thousands of highly talented performing artists of all kinds.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

34
Задание 46 № 646

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Also, although the pieces don't tell a story in the way, say, a ballet does, they explore themes and issues related to our everyday lives.

2 — Charmed Circle regularly tours all the major cities at home and has also been to several European capitals, including Madrid, Prague and Berlin.

3 — Contemporary dance is often termed, more simply, modern dance, though some claim there are slight differences between them.

4 — Nobody would willingly put their bodies through what we do.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

35
Задание 47 № 647

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Also, although the pieces don't tell a story in the way, say, a ballet does, they explore themes and issues related to our everyday lives.

2 — Charmed Circle regularly tours all the major cities at home and has also been to several European capitals, including Madrid, Prague and Berlin.

3 — Contemporary dance is often termed, more simply, modern dance, though some claim there are slight differences between them.

4 — Nobody would willingly put their bodies through what we do.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

36
Задание 48 № 648

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Also, although the pieces don't tell a story in the way, say, a ballet does, they explore themes and issues related to our everyday lives.

2 — Charmed Circle regularly tours all the major cities at home and has also been to several European capitals, including Madrid, Prague and Berlin.

3 — Contemporary dance is often termed, more simply, modern dance, though some claim there are slight differences between them.

4 — Nobody would willingly put their bodies through what we do.


When you first meet Beatrice Smythe, you are struck by her wonderful smile and her well-toned muscles.

'Performing on stage is one of the most exciting experiences possible. All the nerves and fright you feel in the wings just melt away when you face the audience. Although you are aware of a sea of faces watching you, this is not what you concentrate on. (A43) ___ If you focus on this, then your dancing will look natural and unforced.'

So how did Beatrice get started? 'I began taking ballet lessons in a local school when I was six. My teachers felt I had talent but after 11 years of ballet, I realised I wanted to do something different. (A44) ___ That was it! I had never seen dancing like this before and immediately decided it was for me. The following year I was offered a place at a London contemporary dance school where I completed a three-year course.'

Today Beatrice is a permanent member of the Charmed Circle Dance Company. But was it a difficult transition from studies to career? 'I was warned that the competition would be fierce. (A45) ___ Applying for even the smallest part meant auditioning with dozens of others. Finally, I was lucky enough to be offered a trial period of one year with Charmed Circle, even though it meant working without pay. It was an extremely difficult period, as you can imagine.'

'I could have been tempted to join other dance companies on a temporary basis doing one-off paid performances. But this would have meant missing out on the chance to become part of the regular line-up of what is now one of Britain's leading contemporary dance companies.' (A46) ___ But Beatrice's ultimate ambition is to make it to America, where the ideas behind contemporary dance were first pioneered and developed.

When asked about what it takes to become a dancer, Beatrice didn't hesitate. 'You have to love what you're doing, you have to keep pushing yourself to the limit and you have to be slightly mad, tool (A47) ___ Most dancers will tell you how physically painful daily training can be. You also have to be extremely self-motivated'

So what does Beatrice particularly enjoy about contemporary dance?"Well, for one thing, contemporary movements are so different from those in other types of dance. In ballet, for example, the movements are strictly structured and you have to stick to them. In contemporary dance, however, the movements are more expressive and each have individual meanings in themselves. (A48) ___ This makes them very moving experiences both to perform and to watch.'

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

37
Задание 43 № 1363

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions a negative opinion of the way some sportspeople behave?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

38
Задание 44 № 1364

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions having hurt themselves while doing their sport?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

39
Задание 45 № 1365

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions having some enthusiastic supporters?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

40
Задание 46 № 1366

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions not being taken seriously by others?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

41
Задание 47 № 1367

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions learning from observing other sportspeople?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

42
Задание 48 № 1368

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which person mentions the way their sport reflects their attitude to life?


1. Django

Coming second in the free running world championships has landed me roles in music videos, but it doesn't bring in quite enough to get by, so I'm a bike courier. That isn't ideal, but it won't make me quit, and I try to stop it getting me down. I'm always looking out for new opportunities. For instance, I'm currently working on a deal with a potential sponsor — a sportswear company called Free Spirit. That's me! I don't run on a track, I go wherever I want. I don't let any obstacles or worries about danger hold me back. Not when I'm running, nor any other time! There are too many distractions when you play sports in groups. Alone, you can concentrate on each movement, completely in tune your body and your surroundings.

2. Monica

There's still this stereotype of relaxed, supercool surfer. If only it were true! You can't be relaxed if you want to succeed, and for me, second place is as bad as last place. If I see someone doing a new trick it obsesses me. I study all their moves and work out how to copy them. I don't care how many times I fall off the board or how many bruises I get as long as I can do it perfectly in the end. It can be a lonely sport. If you're getting up at dawn every day to catch the best waves, then you don't want to go out much in the evenings. But I figure, I'm young, and all that can wait — I just want a few more trophies first!

3. Mario

My parents were initially against my taking up wheelchair rugby because it's often perceived to be dangerous. Some people even call it 'murderball'! So far I've managed to avoid any crashes on the court myself, although I've had a few near misses. I reckon if you're speedy enough you can avoid most collisions! Anyway, luckily, I managed to persuade my parents to change their minds and so I wasn't forced to give it up. Now I regularly hear them cheering in the stands — they nearly deafen me each time I scorel Wheelchair rugby's so exciting it's becoming increasingly popular with spectators, which is great because that may mean more funding. Sadly, the modified chairs don't come cheap! It'd be a shame if that put anyone off the sport.

4. Gabriella

When I tell people what I do they often laugh, which drives me mad. If I hadn't trained really hard, I wouldn't be where I am today. Looks aren't enough; you've got to have talent, determination and strength. And I mean that in both ways. I work out a lot, often to the point of being completely worn out. As part of an acrobatic routine I sometimes have to carry other girls on my shoulders, and they're not as skinny as they look on TV You also need inner strength. Cheerleading is largely an amateur sport, so you don't get paid, but that doesn't stop it from being very competitive. I have seen instances of bullying among team mates, which is just terrible. I wish it wasn't an issue; I want to feel proud of my sport.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

43
Задание 43 № 1423

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer says that on some days he knows in advance that writing will be difficult?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

44
Задание 44 № 1424

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer thinks that some people may have the wrong impression of a writer's life?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

45
Задание 45 № 1425

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer no longer feels uneasy about the kind of life writing involves?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

46
Задание 46 № 1426

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Which writer says that he feels comfortable with the kind of writing day that he has established for himself?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

47
Задание 47 № 1427

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer requires little persuasion to reward himself for work he has done?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

48
Задание 48 № 1428

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer always tries to delay the time when he has to start writing?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

49
Задание 43 № 1483

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which local campaign mentions that people in the area are not aware of the problem?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

50
Задание 44 № 1484

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Which local campaign mentions that the problem was announced shortly after a report was published?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

51
Задание 45 № 1485

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Which local campaign mentions that there are plans to build a brand new building?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

52
Задание 46 № 1486

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which local campaign mentions that the problem was caused by bad weather?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

53
Задание 47 № 1487

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which local campaign mentions that if the plan goes ahead it will spoil the look of the area?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

54
Задание 48 № 1488

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which local campaign mentions that a meeting will inform people of the problem?


1. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater problems this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation "Homes for All' said: "With not enough accommodation, more people than ever before — young and old — are having to sleep in the open. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to draw attention to the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.

2. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused protests among the population. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause." The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.

3. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if sufficient funds are not found this year. The New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds that they possess, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.

4. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the "Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the complaint made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland that has a history of hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. "Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project," claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to start a local campaign to warn everyone about the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

55
Задание 43 № 1603

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In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

the testers being able to operate the model without reference to the manual


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

56
Задание 44 № 1604

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In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

an explanation of why companies had started to make better radios


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

57
Задание 45 № 1605

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In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

the intended market for the model being evident from its design


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

58
Задание 46 № 1606

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

a tester admitting that he did not trust any type of alarm clock


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

59
Задание 47 № 1607

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In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

an additional feature which made the price seem competitive


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

60
Задание 48 № 1608

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

In which paragraph are the following mentioned?

 

surprise at the commercial success of a particular model


The reporter Stuart Harris, the inventor Tom Granger and the broadcaster Paul Bridges tested four clock radios currently available to pick a good one.

1. The "dual alarm function' that is advertised with this model does not allow you, as Stuart Harris first supposed, to be woken by the buzzer (звонок), have a sleep and then finally be driven out of bed. The instruction booklet advises you to use this function to set two different wake-up times, one for work days and one for weekends, but whose life is programmed to this extent? Since this model is relatively cheap, the inclusion of a cassette player is quite a bargain — you can fall asleep to your own soothing tapes and wake up to a day without news. The men all thought the quality of the radio excellent, too - if only the whole thing was smaller. It's as big as a rugby ball. Paul Bridges said, "Any clock radio I buy has to leave enough space on the bedside table for my keys, wallet, glasses and telephone. Anyway, I'm completely paranoid and always book a wake-up call in case the alarm doesn't go off."

2. Tom Granger described this model with its extra built-in lamp as "incredibly tasteless' in the way it's made. He complained that he had to read the instruction booklet twice before he could get it to work; the clock kept jumping from 12.00 to 0200 so he had to go round again. The light was certainly hard to position; you would never be able to read by it — it only shines on the clock, which is illuminated anyway. Paul Bridges said he was 'very amused by the lamp idea but agreed that the radio was hard to tune (настроить). Interestingly, however, this model is the third most popular on the market.

3. Clearly aimed at young people, with its brightly coloured casing (корпус), this one appealed to the child in Tom Granger. "I would choose this one because it doesn't disappear into the background like the others," he said. In fact, the traditional design of the controls made it the only one the men managed to set up without reading the instruction booklet. Too bad the alarm is allowed a 20-minute margin for error; the manual (инструкция) notes, "the alarm may sound about 10 minutes earlier or later than the pre-set time". Paul Bridges made fun of such a notion, adding that this model was "terribly difficult" and, indeed, "completely useless".

4. The simplest and cheapest of all the models tested, this scored points with Tom Granger because it 'seemed very standard and took up little space', but also because it has old-fashioned dial tuning. "It's more intuitive to set up. With modern push-button tuning you're never really sure if you've pressed all the buttons in the right order so you can't have confidence that the thing will actually work. He accepted, however, that manufacturers had been obliged to improve the quality of radios because of the advent (введение) of button-tuning. Stuart Harris thought the tuning rather approximate, as did Paul Bridges, but they agreed that the radio quality was fine. The buzzer on this model certainly works; it succeeded in getting them out of bed in just two beeps!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

61
Задание 43 № 1663

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which of the people suggests the following?

 

I was impressed with how people reacted.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

62
Задание 44 № 1664

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which of the people suggests the following?

 

Preparations were made for the disaster.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

63
Задание 45 № 1665

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which of the people suggests the following?

 

I didn't think it could happen here.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

64
Задание 46 № 1666

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which of the people suggests the following?

 

We were saved by someone's warnings.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

65
Задание 47 № 1667

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which of the people suggests the following?

 

The experience had a long-lasting effect on me.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

66
Задание 48 № 1668

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Which of the people suggests the following?

 

Disaster had struck in the same place before.


1. David Crossland, 50, was on holiday with his wife, Louise, in the Bahamas when the giant Hurricane Floyd hit New Providence Island.

"We were on holiday on Providence Island last year when Hurricane George was due to hit, but it changed direction. So this year, when Hurricane Floyd was heading towards us, Louise and I were convinced it would change course. But a week into our holiday the island was in the direct path of the hurricane and the hotel staff feared the worst. All of the ground-floor windows and balcony doors in the hotel were boarded up. At one point I tried to open the balcony door in our bedroom to catch a glimpse of the hurricane but the winds were so strong I couldn't move it. All we could do was lie in our bed in the candlelight and wait. It was shocking."

2. Doug Glenwright, 33, was sitting in his front room in Birmingham, England, when he had the shock of his life.

"Last week we were watching on the television how tornadoes wrecked Oklahoma, where you'd expect to see them. Then suddenly last night one of them came down our street. The first I became aware of it was when I saw a dustbin bag come up from the street and fly past the window like a kite. Then branches of trees and all sorts of other debris were pulled up into the air. Telephone lines were knocked down by the hurricane-force winds and the heavy rain caused four feet of flood water in some people's kitchens."

3. Teacher Caroline Casterton, 25, was visiting friends in Istanbul when an earthquake struck.

"I was fast asleep in my friends' apartment when the tremor shook. It lasted only 45 seconds but it felt like an eternity. It was absolutely terrifying. For the next four days and nights I slept on the streets with thousands of others and the scale of the devastation gradually began to sink in. Yet out of the chaos there was the most incredible sense of camaraderie. Everyone seemed so united and I witnessed so much courage and kindness. Since that day I have taken far less for granted and I really do feel life is for living in the present."

4. When Pat Beddows reached 40, she set herself a mountainous challenge in the Himalayas. During the trek disaster struck.

"I set off in a group of 20 from Gangotri, a village at 4,000 metres in the foothills of the Himalayas. As we sat having lunch, we watched huge chunks of ice break away from a glacier, then fall into the water. Unaware of the risk we were taking we climbed down into the glacier to take a closer look. Suddenly, our guide started screaming: "Run Run! Climb up!" A tidal wave of water and ice was heading straight for us and we scrambled up the rocky slopes to safety. Chunks of ice the size of cars were being thrown into the air barely five metres away. If the guide hadn't shouted at us to get out of the way, the consequences would have been tragic. When we got back to camp we were told that, three years earlier, 16 people had died there in a similar incident. I realized how lucky we all were and I burst into tears."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

67
Задание 43 № 1723

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Which photographer says there's a need to be flexible at a shoot?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

68
Задание 44 № 1724

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Which photographer admits to relying on instinctive decisions during a shoot?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

69
Задание 45 № 1725

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Which photographer consciously adopts a particular type of behaviour during a shoot?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

70
Задание 46 № 1726

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Which photographer criticises the attitude of certain other photographers?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

71
Задание 47 № 1727

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Which photographer feels that aspects of a photographer's skill cannot be taught?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

72
Задание 48 № 1728

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Which photographer welcomes suggestions for shots from the subjects themselves?


1. Mary Elton Mark

I loved photography from the moment I first picked up a camera and knew my life would be devoted to it. I don't think you can develop or learn a "way of seeing or a "point of view'. It's something that's inside you. It's how you look at the world. I want my photographs not only to be real but to portray the essence of my subjects, too. To do that, you have to be patient — it can't be rushed. I prefer doing portraiture on location. On a subject's home ground you pick up certain hints that tell you personal things and they come up with ideas.

2. Tina Barney

I don't know how my brain works, but I do know that I work really fast. My shoots don't vary: an hour to set up, an hour to take the shots. And the minute I walk into a room I know what I'm going to shoot, although what that is only becomes clear to me after seeing the result. So it's a subconscious (подсознательный) process. I started taking pictures in the 1970s for all the beautiful reasons photography was known for. Then all of a sudden digital technology booms and darkrooms get disappeared from photography schools. But I really believe in the classical way. It all comes down to looking at a piece of art and dissecting it and understanding how it's put together. I think the most important thing is to go out in the world and see.

3. Rankin

I think if you aren't fascinated by people, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. You don't have to know anything about the people in advance of the session, you just tap into them — it's a skill. Every shoot is different and you have to alter your approach accordingly. You have to try to get into people's heads, so that they can open up to you and give you something. Sometimes we chat first, but sometimes it's good for everyone to be fresh and tense when you start out. I use the technique of being casual and informal and rude or asking my subjects to do ridiculous things, but I don't set out to upset anyone. I hope the viewer sees what I see. I think two words that would describe my work well are: humour and honesty.

4. Sebastião Salgado

It's difficult to explain why we're more attracted to certain images than others. For me, black and white photography has a certain kind of power. I'm talking about instantaneous photography, the kind that happens in a fraction of a second. A great picture is one that transmits a lot of emotion and where you can see who took it; who that person is. I come from a Latin American world, where you believe in things and you form a relationship with your surroundings. I also grew up with a sense of mysticism and belonging. The cynicism that exists in certain kinds of photography, and that pleasure of seeing oneself as a deep individualist, that's not for me. We're a gregarious species made to live together. That's the point of view of my photography and the starting point of all my work.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

73
Задание 43 № 1783

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Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

the effects of excessive (чрезмерное) water consumption


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

74
Задание 44 № 1784

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

a local scheme to improve water provision


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

75
Задание 45 № 1785

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

the effects of dehydration on appearance


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

76
Задание 46 № 1786

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

evidence of improved brain activity


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

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2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

77
Задание 47 № 1787

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

the recommended daily intake of water


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

78
Задание 48 № 1788

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which paragraph mentions the following?

 

a survey result revealing how few of us drink enough water


Drinking water can protect your health, improve your concentration and even prevent depression. Kate Hilpern reports on the dangers of dehydration (обезвоживание).

1. Practically the only time I drink water is when I'm working out at the gym and can feel my body crying out for it. Like millions of people, the rest of the time I prefer some flavour to my drink. Insufficient consumption of water is a serious problem, according to scientists, who claim that anyone drinking less than eight glasses of pure water per day is at risk of dehydration. The consequences, they say, include poor performance at work, depression, allergies and even some cancers. Adding to the problem of getting this message across to the public is the fact that recent studies show drinking too much water can also do harm to your health, causing 'acute water intoxication'. Salt in the blood is weakened in its effect, depriving the brain, heart and muscles of the amounts they need to function properly.

2. One recent poll (опрос) suggests that only one in 10 of us drinks the right amount to meet the body's needs. And it's not only adults who are affected. A quarter of children drink no water during the school day and their performance is affected as a result. Indeed, thirst can cause mental performance to drop by at least 10 percent. Studies of primary schools have found that test results significantly improve when pupils are encouraged to drink water throughout the day.

3. Fizzy drinks (газированные напитки) are four and a half times more popular than water among children. "But soft drinks, including fizzy drinks and fruit juices, contain high levels of sugar," says Barrie Clarke of Water UK, the umbrella organization for water suppliers. This means they are absorbed much more slowly than water so they don't hydrate the brain as quickly." Really high sugar drinks cause a rapid rise in blood sugar level, followed by a sudden drop, which can cause lack of concentration. "Most people know that drinking water is good for you but few realise the huge range of risks that can affect us every day, t lack of concentration, fatigue and irritability," he adds. Then there's your appearance to think of. Lack of water leads to dry and tired looking skin as well as ageing.

4. Recognizing that dehydration is a major health problem, primary schools in one region are taking action by providing water coolers. For every cooler installed in a school, the regional water authority gives away refillable water bottles which children can take into classes with them. "There is still a lot of work to be done around explaining to teachers about the importance of drinking water," said Abusin. 'So part of our campaign is getting them not only to allow children to have water bottles on their desks, but to encourage them to drink from them before they get thirsty."

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

79
Задание 43 № 1843

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader offered money in return for the chance to interact directly with some animals?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

80
Задание 44 № 1844

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader feels that visiting the location has been a life-changing experience?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

81
Задание 45 № 1845

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader mentions one particularly enjoyable form of transport?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

82
Задание 46 № 1846

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader has a suggestion for the inexperienced wildlife tourist?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

83
Задание 47 № 1847

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader suffered some discomfort in order to witness one wildlife event?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

84
Задание 48 № 1848

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which reader got involved in activities designed to help various types of animal directly?


Four readers suggest great locations where you can watch wildlife in its natural surroundings.

1. Kevin: Hallo Bay, Alaska

The first time you see a bear your mouth definitely goes dry. Unlike in other more frequently visited areas, the bears at Hallo Bay don't associate humans with food, so they pose no risk to people. For me, Hallo Bay's a magical place. I've always been a person who was structured and organised, but I've said for years now that I lost my list in Alaska. One thing which makes Hallo Bay so special is that the remote camp has just a dozen guests at a time, with guided groups of no more than half that many heading out to search for the bears. For me, even without the bears it would be a gorgeous place to visit.

2. Ray: Playa Grands Sanctuary, Costa Rica

With concerns mounting about the pressure on the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica's popularity as a wildlife venue could be about to take off, and deservedly so. Costa Rica has it all: iguanas at your feet, capuchin monkeys overhead, sloths (ленивец) and jaguars are to be seen. However, perhaps the most magical thing to do here is to watch turtles lay their eggs on a moonlight beach. It does require patience; we waited two nights, napping on hard benches at the Playa Grande sanctuary, before one of the wardens shook us awake. We were allowed quite close to watch the turtle dig a hole with her flippers and deposit hundreds of eggs. She then casually covered them up and headed off back down the beach.

3. Sarah: Madikwe Game Reserve, South Africa

It's so hard to recommend just one location in Africa to go in search of the big five! However, if you've never been on Safari before, then travel is straightforward in South Africa and its parks are the cheapest if you're short of money. The parks have well-equipped campsites and good-quality roads, so it's perfectly possible to hire a four-by-four and head off on your own. There's also an impressive selection of volunteer projects involving animals, particularly around the country's biggest parks. I spent four weeks helping at a veterinary practice with African Conservation Experience. I got the chance to work with lion, cheetah, elephant and buffalo. The work's extremely hands-on and you have to be ready for anything, whether it's taking a lion's temperature or treating a dog for a snake bite!

4. Amy: Chitwan National Park, Nepal

With tigers, snow leopards and one-horned rhinoceros, Nepal certainly has its share of endangered animals. visited Chitwan at the foot of the Himalayas. The park was set aside for wildlife in 1959 and is the place to see Indian rhinoceros as well as being one of the last refuges of the Bengal tiger. One of the best ways to view both is from the back of an elephant — something that is rather fabulous in itself. We were having breakfast one day when two elephants were being taken for their daily wash on the river bank near our hotel. We made a small donation and asked to help — it was one of the most amazing animal encounters possible, sitting on the backs of those huge elephants scrubbing their backs whilst they knelt in the water and sprayed us from their trunk!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

85
Задание 43 № 1903

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — But when he trains, he trains very hard.

2 — «I try not to let them, but they do.»

3 — This condition should have made it impossible for him to have a career in sport.

4 — Winning that race changed his whole life, but for much of the next three years he was injured.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

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2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

86
Задание 44 № 1904

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — But when he trains, he trains very hard.

2 — «I try not to let them, but they do.»

3 — This condition should have made it impossible for him to have a career in sport.

4 — Winning that race changed his whole life, but for much of the next three years he was injured.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

87
Задание 45 № 1905

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — But when he trains, he trains very hard.

2 — «I try not to let them, but they do.»

3 — This condition should have made it impossible for him to have a career in sport.

4 — Winning that race changed his whole life, but for much of the next three years he was injured.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

88
Задание 46 № 1906

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — It took a lot of persuasion because Bolt had been running the distance for less than a year and was surviving on a diet of junk food.

2 — But before that he has more to achieve on the track.

3 — I ask him what’s it like to run so fast, to race the wind.

4 — His manager says he runs like a cheetah.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

89
Задание 47 № 1907

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — It took a lot of persuasion because Bolt had been running the distance for less than a year and was surviving on a diet of junk food.

2 — But before that he has more to achieve on the track.

3 — I ask him what’s it like to run so fast, to race the wind.

4 — His manager says he runs like a cheetah.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

90
Задание 48 № 1908

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — It took a lot of persuasion because Bolt had been running the distance for less than a year and was surviving on a diet of junk food.

2 — But before that he has more to achieve on the track.

3 — I ask him what’s it like to run so fast, to race the wind.

4 — His manager says he runs like a cheetah.


When Usain Bolt was a young boy growing up in Jamaica, his parents took him to the doctor because he couldn’t keep still. He was gifted at cricket, his first love. ‘But I just happened to run fast. It was easy and I was winning. And my dad said I should concentrate on running because it’s an individual sport and, if you do good, you do good for yourself.’

Nobody can hold a light to Usain Bolt — he is a one-off (уникум). There’s the size, for a start: 1.96 metres (ideal sprinters are thought to be no more than 1.85 metres). Then there’s the scoliosis, a curved spine which means one leg

is shorter than the other. (A43)__And the attitude — at warm-up his rivals look as if they will explode with tension, but Bolt smiles, even dances. And, of course, Bolt is said to be the fastest man ever.

Bolt maintains that he isn’t quite as cool and laid-back as he appears to be. There are things that bother him. (A44)__For example, he says he was so uptight before the junior World Championships final — where he became the youngest gold medallist at the age of fifteen — that he put his shoes on the wrong feet.

(A45)__That’s when Jamaica turned on him. His own people said he was undisciplined, he partied too much.

And yes, he did; but the truth was he was suffering with his spine. People, he says, are quick to criticise.

Bolt arrived in athletics at a time when the profession had lost a lot of respect over drug-taking. Here was a man who looked and acted differently. In 2008, though, he had to beg his coach to let him run the 100 metres at the Beijing Olympics. (A46)__Despite that, not only did he win gold but he broke the 100 metre world record. He broke his own record at the 2009 World Championships and went on to win gold in the 2012 London Olympics in the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the relay.

‘The image on the track is that he just turns up and runs but it isn’t true,’ says his manager. ‘He’s very competitive.’ And the thing is, says Bolt, if he weren’t easy-going, he wouldn’t run so fast. He looks a little blank when I ask him what makes him such a good runner. Perhaps his height help., and those huge strides, he suggests. (A47)__‘The way his feet move, the way the mechanics are so perfect. Everything is perfect for running.’

I’ve never met a sportsman quite like Bolt. He is opinionated, funny and grounded. I ask him about his ambitions. Eventually, he says, he’d like to make a go of playing football professionally. (A48)__‘People say I’m a legend but I’m not until I’ve fulfilled my potential.’

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

91
Задание 43 № 1963

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — And if they lift weights, they risk permanent injury unless they are very careful.

2 — I want to look good on stage, of course, but I’m not sure people realise the amount of time and effort that goes into that.

3 — Back then, models were allowed to have blemishes like spots or wrinkles.

4 — Open a magazine or turn on the TV and you’ll see glamorous people living the ‘perfect’ life.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

92
Задание 44 № 1964

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — And if they lift weights, they risk permanent injury unless they are very careful.

2 — I want to look good on stage, of course, but I’m not sure people realise the amount of time and effort that goes into that.

3 — Back then, models were allowed to have blemishes like spots or wrinkles.

4 — Open a magazine or turn on the TV and you’ll see glamorous people living the ‘perfect’ life.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

93
Задание 45 № 1965

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — And if they lift weights, they risk permanent injury unless they are very careful.

2 — I want to look good on stage, of course, but I’m not sure people realise the amount of time and effort that goes into that.

3 — Back then, models were allowed to have blemishes like spots or wrinkles.

4 — Open a magazine or turn on the TV and you’ll see glamorous people living the ‘perfect’ life.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

94
Задание 46 № 1966

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Fortunately, some media stars are beginning to resist the pressure to look skinny.

2 — Forget the ‘perfect’ people you see pictured in the media.

3 — They often spend huge amounts of time and money trying to look good.

4 — Most of them prefer girls with a bit of shape.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

95
Задание 47 № 1967

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Fortunately, some media stars are beginning to resist the pressure to look skinny.

2 — Forget the ‘perfect’ people you see pictured in the media.

3 — They often spend huge amounts of time and money trying to look good.

4 — Most of them prefer girls with a bit of shape.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

96
Задание 48 № 1968

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Fortunately, some media stars are beginning to resist the pressure to look skinny.

2 — Forget the ‘perfect’ people you see pictured in the media.

3 — They often spend huge amounts of time and money trying to look good.

4 — Most of them prefer girls with a bit of shape.


«Body image» is the picture you have in your mind of your size, shape and general appearance — and how you feel about it. Where does this image come from? Lifestyle adviser Anne Banks examines the issues.

Do you love what you see in the mirror? No? Then you are not alone. Almost everybody worries about what other people think, and we all get stressed out about the size of our feet or the shape of our nose.

It’s the images we see in the media that are mostly to blame. (А43)__ Whether it’s a hunky actor in designer jeans and trendy jacket or a stunning model in an elegant dress, they’re sending the same message: «If you look like me, your life will be perfect».

But appearances can be deceptive. Compare today’s magazine covers with those of fifty years ago. (A44)__ Not any more! Nowadays, blemishes are removed from photographs with the help of a technique called «airbrushing». A photographer or designer can straighten teeth, alter skin colour, and even change a hairstyle. That perfect face is just a trick of the camera after all!

The «perfect» body shapes aren’t natural, either. Go down to any gym and you’ll find young men «pumping iron» in an effort to live up to some masculine ideal that says that «real» men should be strong and muscular. Body builders, desperate to increase the size of their muscles, often eat food with far more calories and protein than is natural, which is a danger to their health. (A45)__

It’s the same for the girls. We all know of celebrities who go on starvation diets so that they can wear «size zero» clothes. They end up ruining their health. The irony is, naturally curvy girls who diet until they’re stick-thin actually end up looking awful. Ask boys! (A46)__ Unfortunately, some girls are so obsessed with their weight they just don’t

realise!

(A47)__ These include pop singers like Mis-Teeq, Jamelia, and Rachel Stevens. Rachel Stevens doesn’t want

to be stick-thin. «There’s always been this pressure to be skinny, but you’ve got artists now like J-Lo and Beyoncé who are really curvy and look absolutely stunning», she says.

So come on boys and girls, take control of your life! We hr mans come in all shapes and sizes and there’s no «correct» to look. It’s what you say and do that really matters. (A48)__ They’re not what they seem! Anyway, why waste

your time trying to live up to somebody else’s ideal? Being fit and healthy is far more important. Just believe in yourself! After all, if you like yourself as you are, everyone else will pro oably end up liking you, too!

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2) 2
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97
Задание 43 № 2023

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — By sçheduling your study time, you’ll be better prepared and will be able to avoid marathon cramming sessions.

2 — Tell yourself that you’ll give it your best shot and make the effort.

3 — Wanting to learn is the first step to smarter study.

4 — Too many students do their homework or exam revision at the last minute.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

98
Задание 44 № 2024

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — By sçheduling your study time, you’ll be better prepared and will be able to avoid marathon cramming sessions.

2 — Tell yourself that you’ll give it your best shot and make the effort.

3 — Wanting to learn is the first step to smarter study.

4 — Too many students do their homework or exam revision at the last minute.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

99
Задание 45 № 2025

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — By sçheduling your study time, you’ll be better prepared and will be able to avoid marathon cramming sessions.

2 — Tell yourself that you’ll give it your best shot and make the effort.

3 — Wanting to learn is the first step to smarter study.

4 — Too many students do their homework or exam revision at the last minute.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

100
Задание 46 № 2026

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Read, stop and review what you have just read.

2 — This doesn’t mean just running your eyes over the lines of the text.

3 — It depends on the content of the review and the length of the text.

4 — By asking yourself questions as you read or study.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

101
Задание 47 № 2027

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Read, stop and review what you have just read.

2 — This doesn’t mean just running your eyes over the lines of the text.

3 — It depends on the content of the review and the length of the text.

4 — By asking yourself questions as you read or study.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

102
Задание 48 № 2028

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Read, stop and review what you have just read.

2 — This doesn’t mean just running your eyes over the lines of the text.

3 — It depends on the content of the review and the length of the text.

4 — By asking yourself questions as you read or study.


If there’s one thing above all that students need to learn, it’s how to learn! More specifically, students need to know how to learn effectively. There are a number of techniques and skills you can employ to improve your learning. Read on to find out more.

First of all, you need to be in the right frame of mind. Studying should be seen as an enjoyable opportunity to learn rather than a necessary evil that prevents you from relaxing or having fun. (A43)___In order to take that step, get rid of any distractions. If you have a computer, a TV or PlayStation in your room, turn it off or study somewhere else. Also, think positively when you study by reminding yourself that you have the skills and abilities to get ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts take over. If you haven’t allowed yourself enough time to prepare for an exam or to write an assignment, don’t give up! (A4)___And never, ever compare yourself with others. We’re all different and we all have different abilities and talents.

Then there’s sçheduling. You have to develop a schedule in order to make the best use of your most valuable resource, time. Маке that schedule and stick to it because it will guide you in how to manage the available time most productively. Don’t! You must take your studying seriously — it isn’t something to be done when you get around to it or have some spare time. (A45)___Do you really think you can learn an entire term’s worth of course material in one night? Of course not. By spending just half an hour a day revising the material, you’ll stay on top of things. Study regularly throughout the term for as many subjects as you car Don’t wait until exam time to open your books!

So, you’re ready to study and you’ve got a schedule. W hat next? Read effectively. (A46)___How often have you read to the bottom of a page and suddenly realised that you remember absolutely nothing? Probably more often than you care to admit. Unless you read ‘actively’, you won’t learn. How do you become an active reader? (A7)___This makes sense as the important things to learn are usually answers to questions. If you ask and answer questions about what, why, how, when, who and where, you will begin to make sense of the material and remember it more easily. Another good technique to use is to break up chapters into sections and deal with each one separately. (A48)___Make sure you understand everything before continuing to the next section. In this way, you steadily build up your understanding of the material in small, manageable steps.

See? It is possible to study and learn without stress if you study smart!

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

103
Задание 43 № 2085

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

2 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.

3 — So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

4 — Typical mundane tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect’s phone records for clues to a crime.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

104
Задание 44 № 2086

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

2 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.

3 — So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

4 — Typical mundane tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect’s phone records for clues to a crime.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

105
Задание 45 № 2087

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Last but not least, a high degree of patience is an absolute must as, believe it or not, crime investigation can often be a very lengthy and boring process.

2 — During this time, the officer learns all the basics of general police work.

3 — So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

4 — Typical mundane tasks include going house to house asking questions or searching carefully through a suspect’s phone records for clues to a crime.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

106
Задание 46 № 2088

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The main difference is the technology and modern science now available to help them.

2 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

3 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

4 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

107
Задание 47 № 2089

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The main difference is the technology and modern science now available to help them.

2 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

3 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

4 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

108
Задание 48 № 2090

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The main difference is the technology and modern science now available to help them.

2 — For every investigation, forms have to be filled in and reports written.

3 — In fact, it is nothing like it used to be.

4 — In addition to catching criminals, they have to give evidence in court.


Anne Carlisle explains the history and work of Britain’s police detectives.

Way back in 1828, the world’s first modern police force was created by Sir Robert Peel. The Metropolitan Police Force of London made its home at the famous Scotland Yard and quickly became the model for police forces around the world. But it would be another decade before the Detective Branch of Scotland Yard was set up. This branch later became the Criminal Investigation Department (commonly known as CID) and to this day remains the main police department in Britain responsible for major crime investigation.

Becoming a plain-clothes detective in the CID is no easy task. Firstly, a police officer needs to have served for at least two years as a uniformed officer. (A43)____Once this period has been completed the officer can then apply to go to a detective training school. However, there’s no guarantee they will be accepted.

In order to become a detective, an officer needs to possess a wide range of skills and qualities, the most obvious being complete honesty and good character. They also need to be highly observant and to have good judgement. (A44) ____An officer with all these skills could more than likely find themselves being accepted to train as a detective.

Most of these ‘detectives-to-be’ discover that the really hard work begins once they get to the training school. There, the officers receive intensive instruction in all areas related to solving major crime. For instance, they will have to learn about psychology, which will come in handy when they are questioning suspects and witnesses. Perhaps the most difficult subjects, though, deal with learning all about the modem scientific methods now used in crime detection.

Once our future Sherlocks have completed their initial training, they begin life as detective constables and start working on unsolved crime cases in the CID. Most of the work they do is not nearly as glamorous as it seems on TV and in novels. (A45)____Not exactly fascinating work, but essential all the same.

Apart from having to do painstaking investigative work, detectives also have a lot of paperwork to deal with. (A46)____Every detail of a crime and its investigation must be recorded. Most detectives find the amount of clerical work they have to do the most frustrating part of their job.

Nonetheless, it can be a very rewarding job; a detective gets great satisfaction knowing they have solved a major crime. However, a detective’s job is still not over after a suspect has been arrested and charged. (A47)____Only when the offender is actually behind bars is the detective’s goal achieved. Then there’s always the next case to tackle, of course.

In many ways, the detectives of today are similar to the ones of the past. Much of the work has hardly changed at all. Detectives still have to ask questions and find answers. (A48)____Whether it is using computers or looking through a microscope, it all helps to get the crime solved. In the end, just like the detectives we avidly watch on TV, they are heroes doing everything in their power to get the bad guys off our streets.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

109
Задание 43 № 2206

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — That meant the added cost of a private tutor at £ 140 a month.

2 — However, all these sacrifices have not been enough.

3 — June has her own reasons for wanting Kelly’s success

4 — All to give their daughter Kelly the chance to become a world champion ice-skater.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

110
Задание 44 № 2207

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — That meant the added cost of a private tutor at £ 140 a month.

2 — However, all these sacrifices have not been enough.

3 — June has her own reasons for wanting Kelly’s success.

4 — All to give their daughter Kelly the chance to become a world champion ice-skater.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

111
Задание 45 № 2208

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — That meant the added cost of a private tutor at £ 140 a month.

2 — However, all these sacrifices have not been enough.

3 — June has her own reasons for wanting Kelly’s success.

4 — All to give their daughter Kelly the chance to become a world champion ice-skater.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

112
Задание 46 № 2209

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — “Mum and Dad have given up their own lives just for me and I’m determined not to let them down.”

2 — Kelly now hopes to make the final three in the British Ice Skating Championship.

3 — The last time I bought a dress was for my son John’s wedding last year.

4 — A few simple steps could reduce the cost.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

113
Задание 47 № 2210

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — “Mum and Dad have given up their own lives just for me and I’m determined not to let them down.”

2 — Kelly now hopes to make the final three in the British Ice Skating Championship.

3 — The last time I bought a dress was for my son John’s wedding last year.

4 — A few simple steps could reduce the cost.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

114
Задание 48 № 2211

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — “Mum and Dad have given up their own lives just for me and I’m determined not to let them down.”

2 — Kelly now hopes to make the final three in the British Ice Skating Championship.

3 — The last time I bought a dress was for my son John’s wedding last year.

4 — A few simple steps could reduce the cost.


June and Malcolm Harding spent their life savings on their first home, and thought they were set for life. But just over a year later, June handed the keys back to the estate agent. Since then they’ve also sold

most of their furniture. (A43)____

What started as a way to stop Kelly being bored in the summer holiday has become the focus of all their lives. She won her first competition after only 10 weeks of skating lessons. Soon after, Kelly’s coach left Britain for Canada and her parting words changed the Harding’s lives for ever. “Find the money to keep Kelly on the ice,” she urged. “She’ll go all the way to the top.” From then on, there was no question — whatever it cost to make Kelly a winner, they’d find a way.

(A44)____“I started skating when I was 10,” — June said. “I saved all the money I could for lessons by doing errands for neighbours. But Mum and Dad were poor and when Mum saved to buy me boots, Dad said that it was a mere waste. I never skated again. I wasn’t going to let that happen to Kelly.” They had to take Kelly out of school so she could practise more. As she was still only fourteen, they had to guarantee the local authorities she’d continue her studies until she was seventeen. (A45)____

“I worked out we only got £ 500 for £ 5,000 worth of furniture — but at least it paid for some more lessons,” said June. “The only things we kept were the TV and video because we can never afford to go out. Luckily, our new accommodation is furnished. We took our car off the road because we can’t afford to run it. We haven’t had a phone for four months, or a holiday in six years.” (A46)____

Despite being permanently poor, June and Malcolm have no doubt they’re doing the right thing. “Just seeing Kelly on the ice, smiling and happy, makes it all worthwhile,” her father said. .“Even if she doesn’t make it she’ll have had the opportunity thousands of girls haven’t.”

Kelly, now seventeen, was placed 13th in last year’s junior championship and has won nearly thirty competitions so far. “I know I’m very lucky,” she admits. (A47)____Her coach, a former British champion, is

convinced she’ll go far. “I think she’ll make the Olympic squad,” she said. “Kelly is an exceptional girl — gifted and very hardworking.”

(A48)____It’s unlikely that her mum will ever see her win, though, because she gets too nervous to watch. “People think we’re mad giving up everything,” continues June, “but we believe in our daughter... I’d do it all over again tomorrow.”

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

115
Задание 43 № 2266

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A43) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Sometimes, though, they get injured too.

2 — And Jack, a film maker, photographer and adventurer, was a diving legend.

3 — They have teeth that tear into flesh like hacksaws

4 — Ideally, a cruising shark would turn and follow the line to the boat.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

116
Задание 44 № 2267

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A44) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Sometimes, though, they get injured too.

2 — And Jack, a film maker, photographer and adventurer, was a diving legend.

3 — They have teeth that tear into flesh like hacksaws

4 — Ideally, a cruising shark would turn and follow the line to the boat.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

117
Задание 45 № 2268

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A45) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — Sometimes, though, they get injured too.

2 — And Jack, a film maker, photographer and adventurer, was a diving legend.

3 — They have teeth that tear into flesh like hacksaws

4 — Ideally, a cruising shark would turn and follow the line to the boat.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

118
Задание 46 № 2269

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A46) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The shark, a six-foot male, seemed mildly annoyed by all the attention.

2 — But gradually my heartbeat settled to a mild thud.

3 — With this in hand, I hesitantly slipped into the sea and swam towards the open cage door.

4 — Jack had advised me to be careful about sharks approaching from the rear.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

119
Задание 47 № 2270

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A47) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The shark, a six-foot male, seemed mildly annoyed by all the attention.

2 — But gradually my heartbeat settled to a mild thud.

3 — With this in hand, I hesitantly slipped into the sea and swam towards the open cage door.

4 — Jack had advised me to be careful about sharks approaching from the rear.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

120
Задание 48 № 2271

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (A48) одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов.

 

1 — The shark, a six-foot male, seemed mildly annoyed by all the attention.

2 — But gradually my heartbeat settled to a mild thud.

3 — With this in hand, I hesitantly slipped into the sea and swam towards the open cage door.

4 — Jack had advised me to be careful about sharks approaching from the rear.


I had been invited by Jack and his son John to participate in a film they were making about shark diving. I had been diving and writing about the ocean for a decade and had frequently found myself in the water with sharks. Never intentionally. They just appeared, unwanted. The idea of swimming with them seemed dangerous. Still, Jack McKen- ney had asked me to participate. (A43)____

To attract the sharks, we laid out plastic boxes wired together and filled with frozen fish. Once dropped over the side, the boxes lay half in and half out of the water: As the bait thawed, a long line of blood and fish followed us. (A44)____

The stars of the film promised to be blue sharks. Fast and slim-bodied with pointed snouts, they grow to 12 feet in length and are known to attack humans. (A45)____I thought someone was welcoming our visitors by pounding rapidly on a large bass drum. Then I realised that the fierce pounding was the beating of my own heart.

The shark cage sat on the deck. It was mainly constructed from wire. The idea was to swim into the cage once under the water. The only hand-held weapon I was given was a broom handle.

By the time I got to the cage, five sharks were swimming around us. As they glided past, they seemed curious, and'I felt like something hung up in a meat market. (A46)____Strangely, proximity seemed to calm my fear.

We began to hand-feed the sharks as they cruised by the cage. Several times, I offered a fish, then yanked it away at the crucial moment. Then I felt guilty about teasing the monsters and began to want more contact.

I decided to go outside the cage. (A47)____“They tend to hit some part of your body that is not moving. Usually this means the head.”

Outside the cage and checking in all directions, I moved to where Jack was shooting one particular shark for the film. (A48)____It put on a slight burst of speed and glided in my direction. I had ten seconds to get my own broom handle in position, and when the shark was a foot away, I hit it firmly, on the snout. The shark twisted away, and disappeared into the depths. Relieved, I realised the mildest show of aggression seemed to put these fellows off their feed.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4

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