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Вариант № 43

Централизованное тестирование. Английский язык: полный сборник тестов, 2012 год. Вариант 12.

1.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A1).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) has dreamt
2) had been dreamt
3) was dreamt
4) is dreaming
2.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A2).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) made
2) is made
3) was making
4) has been making
3.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A3).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) has made
2) made
3) makes
4) was made
4.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A4).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) had often surrounded
2) often surrounded
3) was often surrounded
4) has often been surrounded
5.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A5).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) writes
2) was written
3) has written
4) had written
6.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A6).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) had been broken
2) broke
3) breaks
4) has broken
7.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A7).


Joanne Rowling became famous almost overnight. She is the author of a highly successful series of books for young people, Joanne (A1) ... of being a writer for as long as she can remember. In fact, she (A2) ... up stories and characters ever since she was a schoolgirl. When she was still quite young, the family moved to a town called Chepstow. A family who lived nearby were called Potter, and she used their name for the hero of her books. She and her sister, Di, attended a state school in the town. Joanne's talent for telling stories (A3) ... her a popular figure in the School. During breaks between lessons, she (A4) ... by a crowd of friends, anxious to hear the latest story she (A5) ... .

When she left school, Joanne succeeded in getting a place at university. After graduating, she married a journalist but, sadly, the couple soon (A6) ... up and she moved to Edinburgh. She had no income and couldn't even afford a plastic folder to send her new book to potential publishers. However one wonderful day a publisher (A7) ... 'yes'. It was the greatest day of her life.

1) was saying
2) says
3) said
4) was said
8.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A8).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) in
2) at
3) on
4) with
9.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A9).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) at
2) into
3) from
4) on
10.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A10).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) to
2) by
3) at
4) with
11.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A11).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) a
2) an
3) the
4) -
12.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A12).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) а
2) an
3) the
4) -
13.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A13).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) with
2) on
3) in
4) -
14.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A14).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) a
2) an
3) the
4) -
15.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A15).


Why do so many amusing incidents occur (A8) ... train journeys? I remember the day when a ticket inspector entered the compartment where six or seven people were sitting. Everyone quickly found their ticket except for the man sitting next to me. His hands dived urgently (A9) ... his pockets, and then he began to search through his briefcase. Everyone else could see exactly where his ticket was — he was gripping it between his teeth. The ticket inspector calmly dealt (A10) ... all the other passengers. Then, equally calmly, he drew the ticket from between the man's teeth, examined it with (A11) ... frown and popped it back again. Once the inspector had left the compartment, (A12) ... most of the passengers settled down and carried (A13) ... reading their morning papers. As for the passenger who had had his ticket in his mouth, he popped it into his pocket, looking very relieved. He was generally quite (A14) ... friendly person, so to make conversation I said to him, "You must have felt foolish — searching (A15) ... all your pockets while it was in your mouth." "Foolish?" he whispered. "Not at all — I was chewing the date off."

1) with
2) for
3) in
4) at
16.

Прочитайте предложения. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

 

This apartment has spacious rooms with ... ceilings.

1) far more higher
2) much highlier
3) far highest
4) much higher
17.

Прочитайте предложения. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

 

Ships carry lifeboats ... the crew can escape if the ship sinks.

1) because
2) so that
3) so as
4) in order
18.

Прочитайте предложения. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

 

They thought ... behaviour was perfectly normal.

1) Helen and Sarah's
2) Helen's and Sarah
3) Helen's and Sarah's
4) Helen and Sarah
19.

Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

 

The number of fatal accidents in the construction industry (1) have dropped (2) dramatically (3) in recent years (4).

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
20.

Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

 

It (1) really hurt me (2) that Terry didn't even bother to (3) introduce he (4).

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
21.

Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

 

In the late ninety (1) teenagers were dropping out of school (2) in huge numbers (3), until a group of parents and teachers decided to do something about it (4).

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
22.

Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

 

The winds are increasing at an alarming rate (1) so it is (2) a high probability (3) that a tornado is on the way (4).

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
23.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A23).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) familiar
2) prepared
3) intelligent
4) aware
24.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A24).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) made
2) done
3) turned
4) taken
25.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A25).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) brain
2) mind
3) though
4) head
26.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A26).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) interrupt
2) remove
3) persuade
4) prevent
27.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A27).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) outcome
2) result
3) effect
4) consequence
28.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A28).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) short
2) lacking
3) missing
4) absent
29.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A29).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) suggests
2) advises
3) makes
4) explains
30.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A30).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) require
2) need
3) depend
4) trust
31.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Заполните пропуск (A31).


It can take a long time to become successful in your chosen field, however talented you are. One thing you have to be (A23) ... of is that you will face criticism along the way. The world is full of people who would rather say something negative than positive. If you've (A24) ... up your (A25) ... to achieve a certain goal, such as writing a novel, don't let the negative criticism of others (A26) ... you from reaching your target, and let constructive criticism have a positive (A27) ... on your work. If someone says you're totally (A28) ... in talent, ignore them. That's negative criticism. If, however, someone (A29) ... you to revise your work and gives you good reasons for doing so, you should consider their suggestions carefully. There are many film stars who were once out of work. There are many famous novelists who made a complete mess of their first novel — or who didn't, but had to keep on approaching hundreds of publishers before they could get it published. Being successful does (A30) ... on luck, to a certain extent. But things are more likely to (A31) ... well if you keep trying and stay positive.

1) turn out
2) make out
3) pick out
4) look out
32.

Выберите ответную реплику, подходящую по смыслу к предложенной реплике-стимулу.

 

I'd like to go for a drink now.

1) Nor do I.
2) Neither would I.
3) Either had I.
4) So would I.
33.

Выберите реплику-стимул, подходящую по смыслу к предложенной ответной реплике.

 

Is it?

1) Don't blame me. It isn't my idea.
2) It worries me the way he keeps changing his mind.
3) It's time for dinner.
4) It seems that we are not welcome here.
34.

Выберите реплику-стимул, подходящую по смыслу к предложенной ответной реплике.

 

That's very nice of you!

1) I have to go now.
2) I am taking the driving test soon.
3) Would you like me to carry your shopping?
4) Could you pass me the salt?
35.

Расположите реплики так, чтобы получился связный диалог. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

 

A. How do you like commuting to London every day? Don't you find it a strain?

B. I used to feel the same as you, but now I quite enjoy it.

C. It was awful at first, especially getting up before dawn. But it's bearable now that I am used to it.

D. In the morning I just sit in comfort and read the papers and on the way home at night I relax or have a nap, or chat with friends.

E. Don't you think it's a waste of time to spend three hours sitting in a train every day?

F. How do you pass the time?

1) ACEBFD
2) AECFDB
3) ABFCED
4) ABECDF
36.

Прочитайте текст и выберите вариант ответа, соответствующий его содержанию.

 

What was the last thing the writer would do to ensure Bobbie arrived for dinner?


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) He would telephone him.
2) He would send him a telegram.
3) He would write him a letter.
37.

Прочитайте текст и выберите вариант ответа, соответствующий его содержанию.

 

When did Bobbie and Mary start arranging their wedding?


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) while they were playing a game of polo
2) when Bobbie was sick in hospital
3) as soon as Bobbie had recovered from his injuries
38.

Прочитайте текст и выберите вариант ответа, соответствующий его содержанию.

 

When the writer went to Bobbie's flat for dinner, he


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) was astonished at Mary's expensive clothes.
2) felt that something exciting was going to happen.
3) was favourably impressed by Bobbie's wife.
39.

Прочитайте текст и выберите вариант ответа, соответствующий его содержанию.

 

How did Mary behave at dinner?


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) She kept her true feelings hidden.
2) She worked hard on keeping the conversation going.
3) She gave the impression of being a careless hostess.
40.

Определите значение указанного слова в тексте.

 

recovering (§ 4)


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) putting on a piece of clothing
2) pulling herself together
3) reappearing
41.

Определите значение указанного слова в тексте.

 

particularly (§ 5)


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) especially
2) partly
3) probably
42.

Выберите правильный вариант перевода в соответствии с содержанием текста.

 

Everything appeared to be running along as smoothly as you could want. (§ 3)


§ 1. I want to tell you about my old friend Bobbie Cardew. If you're a recent acquaintance of Bobbie's, you'll probably be surprised to hear that there was a time when he was known for having a weak memory. In the days when first knew him Bobbie Cardew was the most unreliable person you could ever imagine. If I invited him to come and have dinner with me, I had to go to all sorts of trouble. I used to post him a letter at the beginning of the week, and then the day before send him a telegram, and a phone call on the day itself.

§ 2. One day Bobbie did something I would never have expected. He fell in love, got married — full of excitement, as if it were the greatest fun in the world — and then began to find out things.

§ 3. Her name was Mary Anthony. She was a hospital nurse. When Bobbie Smashed himself up playing polo she was there in the hospital taking care of him. No sooner was he up and about again than they were busy making wedding plans. A real case of love at first sight They took a flat and settled down. I was in and out of the place a good deal. Everything appeared to be running along as Smoothly as you could want. Mary seemed to think Bobbie the greatest thing on earth and Bobbie seemed to think the same about her.

§ 4. But now we come to the incident of the Quiet Dinner, which is when things began to happen. I met Bobbie in the street one day and he asked me to come back to dinner at his flat. When we got there I was amazed at how lovely Mary looked. She had her red-gold hair piled up on her head with a diamond tiara in it and was wearing a really beautiful dress. No wonder, I thought, that Bobbie liked married life. "Hello, dear," he said. "I've brought Reggie home for a bit of dinner." Mary stared at him as if she had never seen him before. Then she turned scarlet. Then she turned white as a sheet of paper. Then she gave a little laugh, before finally recovering herself. After that she was all right. She talked a lot at dinner, teased Bobbie and played tunes for us on the piano afterwards, as if she hadn't a care in the world. But I had seen her face at the beginning, and I knew that she was working hard to keep herself in hand and not scream. At the very earliest moment I made my excuses and got away.

§ 5. When I met Bobbie at the club next day he seemed glad to have someone to talk to."Do you know how long I've been married?" he said "About a year, isn't it?" "Not about a year," he said sadly. "Yesterday was the anniversary of the wedding. I'd arranged to take Mary to the theatre. She particularly wanted to hear Caruso sing. I had a ticket for the box in my pocket. You know, all through dinner I had some vague idea that there was something I'd forgotten, but I couldn't think what."

1) Все, казалось, шло так гладко, как только можно было пожелать.
2) Создавалось впечатление, что все бежит вперед не останавливаясь.
3) Оказалось, что все было пущено на самотек так, как только можно было себе представить.
43.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer says that on some days he knows in advance that writing will be difficult?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
44.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer thinks that some people may have the wrong impression of a writer's life?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
45.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer no longer feels uneasy about the kind of life writing involves?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
46.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer says that he feels comfortable with the kind of writing day that he has established for himself?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
47.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer requires little persuasion to reward himself for work he has done?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
48.

Прочитайте тексты. Ответьте на вопросы. Выберите номер текста, отвечающего на вопрос.

 

Which writer always tries to delay the time when he has to start writing?


1. I'm no good at mixed days — it's either work or play. If it's a work day, then I'll start with a huge mug of strong black coffee and then I'll go to my study at the top of the house. I've learned to start writing early and to have a scene hanging over from the day before. I'm obsessive about silence. I can't talk in the middle of work — if I talk, the morning is over. When I go out, I do all the things you're supposed to as a writer, like going out to London clubs. But when people see you at book launches (презентация) they forget that being a writer is also about that little thing in between — sittin on your own all day. But you've got to have contact with the outside world and real people or you can go completely mad.

2. I'm envious of people who write in the mornings and do what they like in the afternoon. I work through the day and treat writing like an office job. My office is in a flat about ten minutes from our house. It's good to have a geographical break between home and work. I arrive about 9 am, have a coffee and then I'll just get on with it and work through until lunchtime. There's a definite post-lunch dip — that's when I have another coffee. But in the end, the only way I get concentration back is by pushing it. My wife picks me up about 6.30 and we go home together. I've been doing this for ten years now. It's a routine that suits me and, to be honest, I'm always a little worried about breaking it.

3. My seven-month-old daughter, Matilda, gets me up around 6.30 and I'll play with her for a couple of hours, then go to my desk. I officially sit there for three hours but I'll do an hour's work. Like a lot of writers, I tend to get a great sense of achievement very easily. One good sentence entitles me to half an hour off — two or three lines means I can watch daytime TV. My study is at one end of the flat and my wife and daughter are at the other. In theory, no congress takes place until lunchtime, but actually we pop in and out all the time. I've never been one of those writers who likes being isolated — I want people around me R the time.

4. I have a really slow start to the day. I'll do anything to put off starting work. I have toast, read newspapers — I have to do the crossword every morning — and deal with my post. I write quite slowly and not in chronological order. I've structured the story before I start, so I can hop around which I think keeps my writing fresh. Sometimes I wake up and just know it's not going to work — because I'm just not in the right mood — but I know that it's only temporary. Once you've got the first draft down, you know that it's going to be OK. When I started writing and just stayed at home I felt incredibly guilty but now it feels normal. Lots of my friends are creative and don't go to offices, which helps. When we go out we don't talk about work — we gossip about the people we know instead. But if I want to use anything my friends have told me, I always ask.

1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
49.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее по смыслу слово из предложенных. B ответ запишите слово в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить. Заполните пропуск (B1).

 

BELIEVE, ENVIRONMENT, TEMPT, WANT


Resisting the (B1) ... to buy is hard. Now guilty shoppers keen to get rid of (B2) ... purchases have a new option — simply give it away online. I find it (B3) ... that everything advertised on Freecycle is free. The site is the creation of Deron Bcal, an (B4) ... from Arizona. Bcal says his chief aim is to cut waste and help the environment reducing the amount of rubbish sent to landfill sites (свалка), through the promotion of giving things to people who want them.

50.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее по смыслу слово из предложенных. B ответ запишите слово в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить. Заполните пропуск (B2).

 

BELIEVE, ENVIRONMENT, TEMPT, WANT


Resisting the (B1) ... to buy is hard. Now guilty shoppers keen to get rid of (B2) ... purchases have a new option — simply give it away online. I find it (B3) ... that everything advertised on Freecycle is free. The site is the creation of Deron Bcal, an (B4) ... from Arizona. Bcal says his chief aim is to cut waste and help the environment reducing the amount of rubbish sent to landfill sites (свалка), through the promotion of giving things to people who want them.

51.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее по смыслу слово из предложенных. B ответ запишите слово в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить. Заполните пропуск (B3).

 

BELIEVE, ENVIRONMENT, TEMPT, WANT


Resisting the (B1) ... to buy is hard. Now guilty shoppers keen to get rid of (B2) ... purchases have a new option — simply give it away online. I find it (B3) ... that everything advertised on Freecycle is free. The site is the creation of Deron Bcal, an (B4) ... from Arizona. Bcal says his chief aim is to cut waste and help the environment reducing the amount of rubbish sent to landfill sites (свалка), through the promotion of giving things to people who want them.

52.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее по смыслу слово из предложенных. B ответ запишите слово в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить. Заполните пропуск (B4).

 

BELIEVE, ENVIRONMENT, TEMPT, WANT


Resisting the (B1) ... to buy is hard. Now guilty shoppers keen to get rid of (B2) ... purchases have a new option — simply give it away online. I find it (B3) ... that everything advertised on Freecycle is free. The site is the creation of Deron Bcal, an (B4) ... from Arizona. Bcal says his chief aim is to cut waste and help the environment reducing the amount of rubbish sent to landfill sites (свалка), through the promotion of giving things to people who want them.

53.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (B5) только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.


My friend and I had been (B5) ... plans for this holiday for a long time. It was our dream to take a break from work for a couple of months, and have a holiday that (B6) ... of us would ever forget. We (B7) ... a lot of research and had a few arguments before we made our final decision, but at last we both agreed on Thailand.

54.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (B6) только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.


My friend and I had been (B5) ... plans for this holiday for a long time. It was our dream to take a break from work for a couple of months, and have a holiday that (B6) ... of us would ever forget. We (B7) ... a lot of research and had a few arguments before we made our final decision, but at last we both agreed on Thailand.

55.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск (B7) только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.


My friend and I had been (B5) ... plans for this holiday for a long time. It was our dream to take a break from work for a couple of months, and have a holiday that (B6) ... of us would ever forget. We (B7) ... a lot of research and had a few arguments before we made our final decision, but at last we both agreed on Thailand.

56.

Прочитайте текст. Выпишите по два лишних слова в порядке их предъявления в тексте.

 

The term "drugs" covers many kinds of chemical substance which there are absorbed by the body, the majority being medicines designed to cure illnesses. They are manufactured from a variety of sources which include such animal products, plants and minerals.

57.

Прочитайте текст. Выпишите по два лишних слова в порядке их предъявления в тексте.

 

In recent years it has become possible to synthesise it in the laboratory many drugs which previously obtained from plants and animal products. A small number of drugs can become addictive.

58.

Переведите на английский язык фрагмент предложения, данный в скобках.

 

I bumped into an old friend of mine in Woolworth's the (на днях).

59.

Переведите на английский язык фрагмент предложения, данный в скобках.

 

I can't (понять) out what he is trying to do.

60.

Переведите на английский язык фрагмент предложения, данный в скобках.

 

The results were hardly encouraging, (не так ли)?